Thursday, April 18, 2013

More research




Found at least part of an answer to one of my questions here http://www.beautylish.com/a/vxymi/too-faced-sweet-sun-shines-lip-gloss. So this is one kind of lip gloss, shows you what I know, I’m still not sure of the exact lines between lip gloss or lip stick are. Think there is at least one other too. The lip glosses in the link are not only somewhat colored they have scents. I notice they say “Try layering Sweet Sun Shines over your favorite lipstick for a sultry, shiny finish.” They also say “And though the product looks glittery in the tube, it glistens more subtly after it’s applied. “ Which I would think would be a good thing if you are using on top of lipstick.
            Back to the article that I was working through, just thought I’ld put down what I found out about lip gloss. Encase you forgot here it is http://www.lhj.com/style/beauty/makeup/step-by-step-makeup-application/?page=2 Yep, still at step two, well maybe not step two but the second part in. I notice on foundation (If I’m following along correctly) they say “The true test of a color match comes when you start patting and blending it out.” So for me, put it on see if it looks ok while trying to do this on YouTube then ask people if I messed up.  They say “We put foundation over the eyelids; concealer under the eyes, and around the nostrils.” I guess the concealer under the eyes and nose is for shadows, or maybe wrinkles or bags under the eyes. (Just a guess.) I like what they say next “We use powder to take away the shine but leave a healthy sheen -- just a bit on a large powder brush, swept around her entire face.” So take off some, but not too much I guess? Then they say “Next: the "drop cloth" trick of depositing extra powder under the eyes to catch any eye makeup fallout.” The only drop clothes I know about are in painting. I think I’ve seen a woman do this in a makeup tutorial it was a small cloth. I guess this is what they mean. (If you need a painting drop cloth, ladies you are probably putting on way to much makeup! I’m kidding!) Oh boy then they say “On to the eyes: Aubergine shadow goes across the lid, from the lashline to slightly beyond the crease, where it fades away.” I’m going to Google Aubergine, what in the world is that? According to Google it is “A dark purple color like that of eggplant.” So it’s a color, didn’t know that. I probably can’t see it real well.
Looking at the picture of the eggplant all I can think is “That’s dark purple?” It almost comes out black to me, maybe a few shades lighter. Joy! I notice they say “I worked with a minimal amount of product on a large shadow brush.” Probably would be really dark if you used a lot of it! I think this part is important if I understand correctly. They say “Then a thin veil of powder sets and blends the edges. Note: As long as the shadow you use is a powder, you can go back and add more -- even after it's set with translucent powder -- to get to the level of intensity you want. Then dust with translucent powder again.”
I’ll have to try this sometime. As I stated before, from the research I’ve done so far for a cross dress such as myself you would most likely have to use liquid foundation with powder and concealer on top I guess?
Well enough makeup up and color discovery for tonight. Hopefully Ladie's Home Journal will not mind me quoting their article. All rights go to them, I’m just trying to use the information in it as a starting point. They don’t seem to have a way to contact them unless you are a subscriber; unless you want to use Twitter or Facebook and let’s face it they wouldn’t take me seriously or possibly even care since I am including the link to the article.
Love,
Marilyn